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20130801
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
since obama has been in office. detroit, youention hear about the vagrancy, they put on the labor unions and the government there and so forth. is a placeriver called windsor, candidates, where ford motor company have a major plant. that plan does not have to pay for the medical benefits for the workers. that is why ford is very successful. you've got to look at everything within that aim. just general motors did not know what they were doing. motors the general pushing brooms making $100 an hour. i tell you what, funny one of those jobs, and i will give you 20% of my pay every week. thank you very much. host: the next call independent line. valerie, you are on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. benjamin should quit listening to the liars on msnbc. what i really called to see as i do not see how there will ever be a copper mines when you have one side that look believes in big government and one -- and more spending and one side that leaves in smaller government and less spending. i do not see how there can never be a copper mine. -- a compromise. they are two totally differ
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
, the stench of his blood was in the air. the big march in detroit, the week later. of course, the birmingham monday less than a month later. then kennedy. there was a season of tumultuous uprising in our country and a lot of bloodshed along the way and a lot of fear. >> and that issue of where the vines was coming from and who should fear the violence. i'll talk to you for a moment. i have something i would like us to listen to. on meet the press, roy wilkins being asked about the likelihood that it would be marchers who would riot. let's take a listen. >> mr. wilkins, there are a great many people, as i'm sure you know, that believe it would be impossible to bring more than 100,000 militant negroes into washington without incidence and possibly riot. >> i don't think there will be any rioting. i don't think a hundred thousand people, just assembling, is cause for apprehension about a riot. the city of washington has accommodated much larger crowds and nobody has talked up in advance the possibility of violence. >> so as you just pointed out, all of the violence up to this moment had been ag
to take place. >> juan, go ahead and respond to wayne there. weologist know, detroit, 41% poverty rate and st. louis 21%. the ten most dangerous cities in the country have the highest, most elevated poverty numbers in the country. >> yeah, poverty, unemployment, failure drops out from school and, guess what, a high percentage of minority. it hurts my heart. but, wayne, this is what you need. you need leadership that will come in and speak to kids who are not advancing and who are not making any progress and, instead, get involved with gang activity and with violence and this is how they can prove there is somebody in this world. that's a losing prescription. you have to believe in education. you have to believe in a job and building a resume. i don't think that this is a mystery if you want to make it in america. >> jonathan, there is -- >> even maybe a minimum wage job that would keep a young person out of trouble and focused on producing on the future. i mean, there's no question the gang has already pointed out. less likely to be this type of violent crime in a stronger economy. you
momentarily. i am from detroit. i lost my parents at an early age. brother.raise a i was able to go to school and i graduated out of high school at 16. i was able to get an associates degree. i found work at a hospital. our kids need be education. month.be 54 next i have been sick all my life. my family came from tennessee. they always fought. >> vivian, what stood out today? what speech or comment? >> what did you say? >> diane black, ok? i am black, ok? they did not want us to take welfare. they taught us to be independent. you calling ine and sharing your story. to facebook, you can see a lot of the video on facebook. here is a comment. w bush and george w. bush declined to participate because they have health issues. george w. bush did release a statement earlier today that read -- the statement from former president george w. bush, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from unive
, the epa, the irs, the justice department to go on and on and on. it's like they want us to be detroit. we didn't vote for him. he got no votes from the state, thank you, oklahoma. but we are paying for it. and he doesn't end run around everybody. what can we do to get oklahomans working, to get these things implemented without him sitting up there and saying, this is what you're going to do, instead of the people that own this country telling them? [applause] >> you know, i would kill you don't blame it all on obama because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. b
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)